Tag Archives: Certified Public Accountant

What The Fiscal Cliff Means For Your Taxes

After tense negotiations—with a lot of publicity and the threat of deadlock and S & P credit downgrades—the terms of a fiscal cliff resolution have finally been successfully negotiated.

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The major tax provisions are as follows:

• The income tax rate increases to 39.6% (up from 35%) for individuals making more than $400,000 a year ($450,000 for joint filers; $425,000 for heads of household);

• The two-percentage-point reduction in payroll taxes for Old Age, Survivors and Disability Insurance (OASDI) tax, commonly known as the Social Security tax, will be allowed to expire;

• The higher exemption amounts for alternative minimum tax (AMT)—the so-called “patch”—are made permanent, resulting an estimated 30 million taxpayers escaping being subject to the AMT;

• Dividends and capital gains are taxed at 20% (up from 15%) for individuals making at least $400,000 ($450,000 for joint returns);

• The Personal Exemption Phaseout (PEP), which had previously been suspended, is reinstated with a starting threshold of $300,000 for joint filers and a surviving spouse, $275,000 for heads of household, $250,000 for single filers, and $150,000 (one-half of the otherwise applicable amount for joint filers) for married taxpayers filing separately. Under the phaseout, the total amount of exemptions that can be claimed by a taxpayer subject to the limitation is reduced by 2% for each $2,500 (or portion thereof) by which the taxpayer’s adjusted gross income (AGI) exceeds the applicable threshold;

• The “Pease“ limitation on deductions, which had previously been suspended, is reinstated with a threshold of $300,000 for joint filers and a surviving spouse, $275,000 for heads of household, $250,000 for single filers, and $150,000 (one-half of the otherwise applicable amount for joint filers) for married taxpayers filing separately. Thus, for taxpayers subject to the “Pease” limitation, the total amount of their itemized deductions is reduced by 3% of the amount by which the taxpayer’s AGI exceeds the threshold amount, with the reduction not to exceed 80% of the otherwise allowable itemized deductions;

• For estate, gift, and generation-skipping transfer (GST) tax purposes, for individuals dying and gifts made after 2012, there is a $5 million exemption (adjusted for inflation), and the top estate, gift and GST rate is permanently increased from 35% to 40%;

• Tax credits for businesses, including the Code Sec. 41 research credit and the Code Sec. 199 domestic production activities deduction, are generally extended through the end of 2013;

• A number of individual tax provisions have been retroactively extended through 2013. In addition, there is a five-year extension of credits that were enhanced as part of the stimulus, including the college tuition credit, the Code Sec. 32 earned income tax credit, and the Code Sec. 24 child tax credit;

• Various energy credits are also extended.

• Other nontax provisions in the bill include a “doc fix,” which stops a 27% reduction in payments to Medicare doctors scheduled to go into effect. Spending cuts as offsets to accomplish this. Unemployment benefits, which were set to expire at the end of 2012, are extended for the long-term unemployed through the end of 2013

For more details please contact us. The information contained within this website is provided for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute for obtaining accounting, tax, or financial advice from a professional accountant.

 

CPA Deerfield Beach

 

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Deductions Still Available For 2012

Deductions Still Available  For 2012

 

 

Tax Saving Tips // Tax Preparation

 

 

 

Tax Savings Ideas For 2012

There is good news there is still a way to make a deduction for the previous year. The most sensible, legal tax-saving move for anyone that wants deductions for last year is to to fully fund one’s  IRA or SEP.

 

The funding can be postponed until the due date of the return, so there isn’t a panic to fund those right now.

 

 

What is an IRA?

 

 

IRA stands for Individual Retirement Account, and it’s basically a savings account with big tax breaks, making it an ideal way to sock away cash for your retirement. A lot of people mistakenly think an IRA itself is an investment – but it’s just the basket in which you keep stocks, bonds, mutual funds and other assets.

 

 

What is a SEP?

 

 

A SEP is a simplified employee pension plan. A SEP plan provides a way for the self-employed to fund their own retirement.

 

Frequently a client with a second business will ask, “If I am an employee and participate in my employer’s retirement plan, can I set up a SEP for self-employment income?

 

Yes. A SEP can be set up for a person’s business even if he or she participates in another employer’s retirement plan.

 

We are here to accommodate clients with good service that is convenient, and priced fairly. Our office is here to answer any tax questions that you need help with.

 

CPA Deerfield Beach

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Setting up Vacation Policies in Quickbooks

Quick Books Vacation Setup

Vacation time is an opportunity for workers to rest and return to work rejuvenated.

Time off can increase productivity, boost morale and instill
an appreciation for the benefits of working for a company.

Surprisingly, not accounting for this diligently can cost the company money. Many employers often complain about this.

To set up an employee to track sick/vacation in QuickBooks Pro and Premier:

1) Click on Employees on the top menu bar, then choose Employee Center.

2) Double-click the employee’s name.

3) From the Change tabs drop-down menu, select Payroll and Compensation Info.
Click Sick/Vacation.

4) In the Vacation part of the Sick & Vacation window, enter the amount of hours of vacation currently available for the employee in the Hours Available as of box. Note: This is the hours available as of today regardless of the date field. The date field defaults to the employee’s hire date in QuickBooks and does not impact the accruals. This field should indicate the amount of time available as of today.
In the Accrual period drop-down box, select how often the employee will accrue vacation.

There are 3 different ways to accrue Sick and vacation in QuickBooks:

Beginning of Year–Grant a certain amount of hours in the beginning of year.

Every Paycheck–Accrue certain number of hours per paycheck

Every Hour on Paycheck–Accrue every hour on paycheck.

In the Hours Accrued window, enter the amount of hours that will be accrued based on how often the employee accrues hours which you selected in the Accrual period drop-down box.

Enter the total amount of vacation hours the employee can have in the Maximum number of hours window.
Click the Reset hours each new year box if you want the number of vacation hours for the employee to start over at zero each new calendar year.

Click OK twice

Call us or contact us your Deerfield Beach Quickbooks Consultant

CPA Deerfield Beach

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Quickbooks Setup

Quickbooks Consultant

Quickbooks Consultant

The chart of accounts is the first part of the setup. This is the foundation to getting your QuickBooks in order.

Making a good chart of accounts is can save cost, time later, money and frustration. We can have your QuickBooks setup correctly to suit your particular needs.

When is set-up and working properly, we can train the staff to operate QuickBooks specifically for your business. If you are a small business you understand the importance of keeping current and accurate financial records. And, with accurate information you can make educated decisions regarding your business!

Keep in mind – we are training you or your staff in how to use QuickBooks. We are NOT training you how to be an accountant. We’ll make it easy to understand and move at a pace that you’re comfortable with.

Why choose one-on-one attention instead of taking a class?

We’ll come to your location

  • We’ll focus on the individual issues facing your business
  • We’ll be there to answer your specific questions and concerns
  • No need to spend time on features that don’t impact your business
  • It’s probably cheaper than you think
  • You learn at your own pace

How Do We Get Started?

Call or fill out the contact form so we can learn a little more about your specific needs.

Next we’ll send you a detailed list of topics we’ll cover.

And lastly, we’ll schedule your training either at your office or ours.

(Click here to see the full QuickBooks training outline)

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Converting nondeductible personal interest into deductible…


Many individuals and families (particularly those with school-age children), use personal loans or credit cards to buy cars or vans, finance private schooling, take vacations, etc.

If you are making significant payments on these kinds of debts, you know you can’t deduct the “personal interest.” That means you are paying the interest portion with after-tax dollars (and perhaps at very high rates as well).

There’s a way to convert your nondeductible interest payments into deductible expense. You can get this tax break if you own your own home.

Specifically, you can take out a home equity loan (in the normal way, from your bank for example) and use the proceeds to pay off your nondeductible debts. You will probably be paying at a lower rate, since many lenders are charging near prime on these loans. And the interest payments will be deductible even though you don’t use the loan for anything connected with the house.

Of course, before you borrow against the equity in your personal residence, you should be certain that you actually get the tax deduction benefit. As always, there are various technical restrictions and limits that may apply, depending on your particular tax facts and circumstances.

First, the loan must be secured by your residence. That is, the lender must have a mortgage interest in it. Don’t confuse so-called “home improvement” loans, which are just one type of personal loan, with qualifying “home equity” loans. The interest on an unsecured home improvement loan isn’t deductible.

Second, the residence securing the debt must either be your principal residence (essentially, the home you live in most of the year) or a single second residence, for example, a vacation home which you use for at least part of the year. If you own more than one “second” residence, a home equity loan secured by only one of them (your choice) can qualify.

Third, although, as noted above, home equity debt doesn’t have to be used on the home, there are limits on the amount of debt than can qualify. Specifically, qualifying home equity debt can’t exceed the lesser of (a) $100,000, or (b) your equity in the home (specifically, the fair market value of the home at the date of the loan reduced by the “acquisition debt,” generally, your first mortgage). For example, say a taxpayer takes out a first mortgage to buy a home worth $300,000. Later, when the first mortgage is still $200,000, but because of a downturn in the real estate market the value of the home has declined to $275,000, the taxpayer takes out a home equity loan to reduce his credit card debts and pay for his daughter’s wedding. The taxpayer will only be able to deduct the interest on a maximum of $75,000 of any home equity loan he takes out ($275,000 fair market value minus $200,000 acquisition debt), even though the lender may be willing to make a loan in excess of the taxpayer’s $75,000 equity in the home. Thus, if the taxpayer took out a $100,000 home equity loan, only 75% of the interest on the loan would be deductible.

Also, you should bear in mind that interest on a home equity loan isn’t deductible for purposes of the alternative minimum tax (AMT), unless you use the loan to improve your home. This is an important consideration, since an increasing number of taxpayers are subject to the AMT.

Note that a home equity lender is required to give you an information return (Form 1098) reporting the interest you paid, but that form doesn’t show the deductible percentage, just the total amount of interest paid.

I would be happy to personally go over all of these rules with you to see if the home equity technique—or other tax-saving strategies that your financial situation may suggest—will work for you.

Please contact us so we can meet.

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Filed under CPA Deerfield Beach, Deductions, Depreciation, Home Equity

Business website costs

The business use of websites is widespread, but IRS has not yet issued formal guidance on when Internet website costs can be deducted.

Fortunately, established rules that apply to the deductibility of business costs in general, and formal IRS guidance that applies to software costs in particular (the “software guidelines”), provide a taxpayer launching a business website with some guidance as to the proper treatment of the costs. Here is a brief discussion of some relevant principles:


The time for deducting website design costs (i.e., costs of the website’s overall structure, functionality and appearance) depends on whether the costs are costs of “software” within the meaning of the “software guidelines.” Generally, the portions of the website’s design that are produced from sophisticated programming languages (for example, the “C++” language widely used in website design) will qualify as “software.” On the other hand, there is some doubt as to the extent to which the portions of a design produced from HTML (hypertext markup language) will qualify as “software.”


Website design costs that are “software” costs are deductible under “safe-harbor” rules. The deductibility of website design costs that are “software” costs is governed by the following “safe-harbor” rules.

Generally, if the individual or company launching the website “purchases” the design (i.e., acquires the design from a contractor who is at economic risk should the software not perform), the design costs are amortized (ratably deducted) by that individual or company over the three-year period beginning with the month in which the website is placed in service. Also, non-customized computer software placed in service in tax years beginning before 2013 qualifies as “section 179 property,” and is thus eligible for the Code Sec. 179 elective expensing deduction that is generally available only for machinery and equipment. For tax years beginning in 2011, the deduction is limited to $500,000. For tax years beginning in 2012, the deduction is limited to $139,000. The limits are reduced by the cost of other section 179 property for which the election is made. Also, the election is phased out for taxpayers placing more than $2,000,000 of section 179 property into service during a tax year beginning in 2011 (more than $560,000 for a tax year beginning in 2012). Non-customized software acquired and placed in service in calendar year 2011 is, alternatively, eligible for a 100%-of-cost depreciation deduction (100% bonus depreciation) unlimited by any dollar amount. For software placed in service in calendar year 2012, the bonus depreciation deduction is 50% of cost. The bonus depreciation for an item of software is reduced to take into account any portion of the item’s cost for which a Code Sec. 179 election is made, and regular depreciation deductions are reduced to take into account both the bonus depreciation and any Code Sec. 179 election.

If, instead of being purchased, the website design is “developed” (designed in-house by the individual or company launching the website or designed by an independent contractor who is not at risk should the software not perform), the individual or company launching the website can choose among alternative treatments, including, but not limited to, “currently deducting” the costs (deducting the costs in the year that the costs are paid, or accrued, depending on the taxpayer’s overall accounting method) or amortizing the costs under the three-year rule, discussed above, for a “purchased” design.


Website design costs that aren’t costs of “software” are deductible in accordance with useful life. The time for deducting website design costs that are costs of portions of the design that aren’t “software” depends on the expected “useful life” of these non-software portions of the design. Thus, these costs must be amortized over the number of years that it is expected that the non-software portions of the design will be used in the business (except if it is expected that these non-software portions of the design will have a useful life of no more than a year, in which case the costs can be currently deducted.)


Website content that is advertising is generally currently deductible; the treatment of other content costs will vary. Advertising costs are, generally, currently deductible. Thus, the costs of website content that is advertising are, generally, currently deductible. Website content that isn’t advertising will be currently deductible, or amortized over a multi-tax year period, depending on its useful life.

The deductibility of some website costs that are business start-up costs is limited. Where website costs that would otherwise be currently deductible are paid or accrued before a business begins, the costs are deductible only upon the termination or disposition of the business, unless the taxpayer elects to (1) deduct up to $5,000 of the costs in the year that the business starts and/or (2) amortize the costs over a period of 60 months or more beginning with the month that the business starts.

The above principles, and others that effect the deductibility of website costs, suggest ways in which the individual or company launching the website can “take charge” of the treatment of website costs. For instance, an individual or company who contracts for a website design that qualifies as software, and who seeks the favorable tax treatment that applies to the costs of “developed” software, can, if acceptable as a business matter, include, in its written agreement with the developer/contractor, terms that will put the risk that the software won’t perform on the individual or company. Another example of a way to manage the tax treatment of website costs is detailed, descriptive allocations of costs, both in contracts and in internal records.

If you are considering launching a business website, I will be pleased to discuss with you further, and help you implement, the above planning steps or others that will help you manage the tax treatment of your website costs.

Deerfield Beach CPA

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Filed under Amortization, Deductions, Deerfield Beach CPA, Depreciation, Tax Planning

Avoiding hobby-loss restrictions

Like many of us, you’ve probably dreamed of turning a hobby or avocation into a regular business. You won’t have any unusual tax headaches if your new business is profitable. However, if the new enterprise consistently generates losses (deductions exceed income), IRS may step in and say it’s a hobby—an activity not engaged in for profit—rather than a business.
What are the practical consequences? Under the so-called hobby loss rules, you’ll be able to claim those deductions that are available whether or not the enterprise is engaged in for profit (such as state and local property taxes). However, your deductions for business-type expenses (such as rent or advertising) will be limited to the excess of your gross income from the hobby over those expenses that are deductible whether or not the enterprise is engaged in for profit. Deductible hobby expenses are claimed on Schedule A of Form 1040 as miscellaneous itemized deductions subject to a 2%-of-AGI “floor.” By contrast, if the new enterprise isn’t affected by the hobby loss rules, all otherwise allowable expenses would be deductible on Schedule C, even if they exceeded income from the enterprise.
There are two ways to avoid the hobby loss rules. The first way is to show a profit in at least three out of five consecutive years (two out of seven years for breeding, training, showing, or racing horses). The second way is to run the venture in such a way as to show that you intend to turn it into a profit-maker, rather than operate it as a mere hobby. The IRS regs themselves say that the hobby loss rules won’t apply if the facts and circumstances show that you have a profit-making objective.
How can you prove that you have a profit-making objective? In general, you can do so by running the new venture in a businesslike manner. More specifically, IRS and the courts will look to the following factors: how you run the activity; your expertise in the area (and your advisers’ expertise); the time and effort you expend in the enterprise; whether there’s an expectation that the assets used in the activity will rise in value; your success in carrying on other similar or dissimilar activities; your history of income or loss in the activity; the amount of occasional profits (if any) that are earned; your financial status; and whether the activity involves elements of personal pleasure or recreation.
The classic “hobby loss” situation involves a successful businessperson or professional who starts something like a dog-breeding business, or a farm. But IRS’s long arm also can reach out to more prosaic situations, such as businesspeople who start what appears to be a bona-fide sideline business.
Please call our offices to get more details on whether a venture of yours may be affected by the hobby loss rules, and what you should do right now to avoid a tax challenge.

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